G5 Outdoors tuning your bow

Bow Hunting | The Simple But Overlooked Fine Tuning of Your Bow

Tuning your bow is important but tuning yourself is essential for bow hunting!

Some bow hunters get mighty picky about the bows, arrows, and broadheads they shoot. You know them well, the guys and girls that measure the weight of every arrow, choose the best ones, and write 1-10, best to worst on the fletchings, just to perfect everything for that one moment when it counts. They pull out all the stops to make sure they are on target. But when the moment comes the gear does its job, do you do yours? Fine tuning not only the simple things on your bow but yourself will get you ready for the upcoming bow hunting season.

G5 C-Max

Tuning what matters on the bow will get you sighted in fast. The most simple tuning on the bow is often the most overlooked but important to your shooting. On the to do list for bow tuning this summer are the replacement of strings and cables, correcting the peep sight, and finding the right draw length. Out of everything to go wrong on a bow these are the most common. Strings and cables after long winter and spring could desperately need replacing. After about 3-4 years or signs of severe fraying, they need replaced. Old, worn out, and stretched stings and cables could affect accuracy and possibly even blow your bow up. Second is the peep sight, make sure it is aligned with your anchor point and is straight. Too many bow hunters twist there peep sight right before they shoot and that’s too much movement and chance to play around with in the presence of a buck. A lot of bow hunters also seem to have too long of draws, literally breaking there neck and form to get behind the string. They don’t seem to notice and you might not either, so go to a shop to let a pro tell you.

Perhaps the most important fine tuning is yourself! Nothing else counts if you screw up the shot. Practice consistently and realistically to prepare yourself for bow hunting season. Pay attention to every aspect of the shot, the draw, your breathing, your release, and follow through, and practice with the broadheads you use, practice from the tree, and give yourself difficult and adrenaline filled shots.